“Watch the Woman!” — Why We Should See and Celebrate Women in the Bible

Watch the Woman! Why we should see and celebrate women in the Bible.I’ve been looking for, noticing, celebrating, and writing about the place of women in the storyline of the Bible a lot this year.

Why is that?

In seeing and celebrating women in the storyline of the Bible, I’m not sliding down a slippery-slope of liberalism, about to careen off a cliff into goddess worship.

In seeing and celebrating women in the storyline of the Bible, I am attempting to climb the ladder of careful exegesis and Bible interpretation. I am recognizing the rungs that the Author put in place, and stepping accordingly.

Why should we notice and celebrate women in the storyline of Scripture? Where do you look when you’re expecting someone important? If you’re a child waiting for mom to come home, you look at the front door. You look toward the place from which you know they’ll first appear.

When God first proclaimed the Gospel, he promised deliverance through “the offspring of the woman” (Genesis 3:15). The deliverer will come through her. This promise encourages us to “Look for the offspring!” We read the Bible looking for the arrival of the Redeemer. We read expectantly, hoping each birth brings him. Because of that, this promise then teaches us to “watch the woman” as the storyline unfolds so that we see the Redeemer when he arrives.

Join me in noticing her in the text and celebrating what we see God doing through her (then and now).

#DadsHurtToo (Part 3) — Miscarriage and Shame

Dads Hurt Too: A Father's Memoir of MiscarriageThis is the third post in a series — “#DadsHurtToo — A Father’s Memoir of Miscarriage.”

Our daughter—Living Child #4—entered the world in December 2008 with no complications. In the spring of 2009, we learned another baby was on its way, due in February 2010. On a family vacation in July, my wife experienced strange contraction pains. We saw her doctor when we returned. Continue reading “#DadsHurtToo (Part 3) — Miscarriage and Shame”

Review: ESV Expository Commentary Series

Crossway recently released the first three volumes in their ESV Expository Commentary: Volume VII — Daniel-Malachi, Volume XI — Ephesians-Philemon, and Volume XII — Hebrews-Revelation.

Appearance

The set is well-made, a delight to hold, and attractive. The paper is thick and easy to read from. The ribbon marker is a nice touch. The Smyth-sewn binding seems like it will hold up to long-term use.

Scholarship

The set is edited by Iain M. Duguid, James M. Hamilton, and Jay Skylar. Among the authors are many trustworthy scholars, whose work I’ve come to trust.


WTS Books is offering the volumes on sale at a significant discount (bit.ly/ESVCommentary).


Continue reading “Review: ESV Expository Commentary Series”

#DadsHurtToo (Part 2) — Miscarriage and Comparison

Dads Hurt Too: A Father's Memoir of MiscarriageThis is the second post in a series — “#DadsHurtToo — A Father’s Memoir of Miscarriage.”

Despite arriving pale, blue, and breathless—the umbilical cord cinching a death-grip on his throat—our first child lived, as did our second and our third.

We first experienced the death of a child in the womb in September 2007, a year after the birth of Living Child #3. We lost the baby early in the unannounced pregnancy, at only four and a half weeks. The bleeding started the day after a home pregnancy test. Had she not taken it, we might have thought her cycle had simply started late.

Continue reading “#DadsHurtToo (Part 2) — Miscarriage and Comparison”

#DadsHurtToo (Part 1): A Father’s Memoir of Miscarriage

Dads Hurt Too: A Father's Memoir of MiscarriageMy wife and I have nine children, but if you meet us, we’ll only say we have five. That’s because we’ve only ever named five—the five we’ve met, the five who took breaths, the five we brought home. Four of our children died by “miscarriage.”

Medically speaking, miscarriage is the spontaneous loss of a pregnancy within the first 20 weeks of gestation; it is the death of a baby in the womb. As with most suffering, I did not expect to experience it personally; it happened to other people. I certainly never considered it from the father’s perspective. Miscarriage seemed to be—before it happened to us—solely a woman’s experience, a mother’s sorrow. Now I know differently. Moms hurt, and dads hurt too. Continue reading “#DadsHurtToo (Part 1): A Father’s Memoir of Miscarriage”