I Sinned ≠ I Repent

Yesterday, I posted a short meditation on the difference between saying “I’m sorry” and “I sinned.” I emphasized that expressing sorrow over an action is different than admitted a wrong. When we have done wrong, both are necessary. We should feel and express grief over the harm we have done. Likewise, we should own our wrong-doing; we should admit that what we did was actually wrong. Both are necessary, but both are not sufficient. Love calls us to repent. Acknowledging that we have sinned against our neighbor and expressing grief do not equal repentance. Continue reading “I Sinned ≠ I Repent”

Welcoming Single Parents

This guest post by Wendy Alsup explores how the local church can welcome, include, and minister to single parents. It is part of my “Welcoming…” series, which features first-person articles on how to welcome various demographics into our lives and church communities. Previous installations include “Welcoming the Hearing Loss Community” and “Welcoming the Eating Disorder Community.” 


My little church plant in the Lowcountry of South Carolina has many single parents. On a given Sunday with 40 in attendance, at least 15 regular attenders are single parents and their children. Most are single mothers with primary custody of their children. Continue reading “Welcoming Single Parents”

Recommended: “Becoming a Church That Cares Well for the Abused”

Over the past two weeks, I completed the “Becoming a Church That Cares Well for the Abused” curriculum (and other free abuse training material available through Ministry Grid).
 
I recommend that every church leader, ministry worker, and church member complete it. Having everyone in the church view this material and understand the basics of how to address abuse will go along ways toward having a unified and helpful approach to abuse prevention, response, and care.
 
There are 12 video lessons (~20 minutes each), which are word-for-word what is in the accompanying book (available as a free PDF download).
 
Please carve out some time to benefit from this resource. It doesn’t take much time to complete. You could complete it in 4 hours—a couple evenings or a Saturday morning.