Good Discipleship is Good Editing (Part 1)

good discipleship is good editing

This is the first post in an ongoing series. Find the full series here.


Yesterday, I returned to a novella I wrote about four years ago. I love this story, perhaps as much (or more) than anything else I’ve written. I’ve pitched it to agents and publishers—all of whom loved it but said they don’t publish novella-length fiction unless it is a well-known and established fiction author. Suffice it to say, that’s not me.

I’ve decided to move forward with self-publishing it in both paperback and e-book. (In weeks to come, I’ll be writing more on how you can support that project and possibly get an early peek.)

As I’ve returned to finalizing the piece, I’m reminded again of the importance of good editing and the similarity between good editing and good discipleship. So, as I work through final edits, I thought I’d blog some observations on how the two relate.

Discipleship is Editing

Merriam-Webster defines “edit” as follows:

a: to prepare (something, such as literary material) for publication or public presentation

// edit a manuscript

b: to assemble (something, such as a moving picture or tape recording) by cutting and rearranging
// edit a film

c
: to alter, adapt, or refine especially to bring about conformity to a standard or to suit a particular purpose
// carefully edited the speech

// edit a data file

Christian discipleship could be defined similarly by making simple modifications to that definition:

a
: to prepare a follower of Jesus for presentation (i.e., to live all of life before God; to live in a way that shows the world the Savior; to be presented to Jesus on the final day)

b
: to assemble by cutting and rearranging (i.e., being crucified with Christ; putting off the old flesh and putting on the new)

c
: to alter, adapt, or refine especially to bring about conformity to a standard or to suit a particular purpose (to teach a believer to follow everything that Jesus commanded so that they might be conformed into his image)
Look for more observations in days to come.